My Baseball Card Collection

Published / by wp14089

There was a point in the history of baseball that no one collected baseball cards. At least not in the way that you imagine it today. There may be a variety of reasons why people didn’t pick these up in record numbers, but things changed through the decades. Just like the game of baseball changed, so did the collector’s mindset. I know for instance, My Baseball Card Collection, grew by leaps and bounds between the popularity of the game. In fact, with every high point of baseball’s history, my cards began to come up to all new levels of collecting. There are some interesting notes that that highlight the greatness of collecting, and you may find them interesting.

The Surplus of Baseball Cards

Looking into modern collecting, you’re going to find that the 1950s were when the big boom happened in releasing cards. I’m not quite that old, but if you look at My Baseball Card Collection, you’re going to find that there are cards that come directly from this locale. That’s where you’re going to find the most scarce of cards at times, including the first Mickey Mantle cards that were issued by some of the big names in trading. Topps and Bowman, for instance, were big names in the card manufacturing and release process. The majority of my cards are Topps, at least from the 1950s.

Keeping Things Nice Was Tough

One thing that should be noted about collecting cards from the past is that many weren’t kept nice. Children were the main demographic for collecting baseball cards, mind you, so it is not too uncommon to find that many of the older pieces are not in good shape. Unless you were an adult living through the late 1940s and were collecting and not trading, you probably don’t have many cards that remained mint. If you do have mint cards from this era, however, you’re going to find that you can make a serious amount of cash by trading them in.

The 1980s Is Where Things Took Off

As you look into My Baseball Card Collection, you’re going to find that the 1980s were the best time for collecting. That’s where my collection really took a boom. You see, more cards were starting to get printed, thanks in large part to new companies coming through to license and print up cards. Fleer, Topps, Donruss, and more were printing out cards in record numbers, and the sales were starting to rise. In the mid-1980s, the first major magazine that displayed prices was released, and that’s part of my collection as well. In fact, I still collect and use price guides to make sure that you have something of value.

The 1990s Surplus

As with everything, there comes a point where too many cards were printed and too many people started collecting. In regards to My Baseball Card Collection, the cards from the 1990s are not very rare or in demand. This is because many companies printed out cards, and there were so many people buying them, that they are not worth nearly as much. That doesn’t mean there aren’t rarities, but in comparison to the post war era cards, the more modern your cards are, the less they are valued. I have thousands, that aren’t worth a penny. But they are cool to look at, and I continue to buy, as the modern game is as exciting as ever.